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kohenari:

The International Criminal Court has just this morning handed down it’s first ever verdict, finding Thomas Lubanga guilty of conscripting child soldiers. Lubanga was the leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots and stands accused of being the military authority behind the abduction of children as young as eleven to serve the Patriotic Forces of the Liberation of Congo in the 1998-2003 war. Lubanga was handed over in 2006, the first suspect to be detained by the ICC, and has been on trial since 2009. 
This guilty verdict is great for the DR Congo and wonderful for the International Criminal Court. Last year former Nuremberg prosecutor Benjamin Ferencz told ICC judges: “Let the voice and the verdict of this esteemed global court now speak for the awakened conscience of the world.”
Photo: Ed Oudenaarden/AP.
[AJ English Twitter; Al Jazeera; AP]
I think the last time I wrote about the ICC proceedings against Lubanga was back in 2010,  when the trial was suspended in order to ensure that proper procedures were being followed. As I wrote back then:
Regardless of Lubanga’s guilt (which really doesn’t seem to be in much doubt), the Court is setting an important precedent here: instead of proceeding with a trial that might later be decried as sham justice, the ICC is putting its foot down now … about the fair trial standards that must be followed. The prosecution cannot keep information from the defense and it cannot flout the Court’s orders, not if we’re to look back on these trials and confirm that justice was done.
With so much talk in the past week about Joseph Kony — another warlord indicted by the ICC for conscripting child soldiers — it’s good to see the the Lubanga trial brought to a close with a guilty verdict. International justice efforts, though still slow and selective, are beginning to take a toll on the long-standing culture of impunity for human rights abuses.
Of course, the only way to see more criminals in the dock is to arrest them …

kohenari:

The International Criminal Court has just this morning handed down it’s first ever verdict, finding Thomas Lubanga guilty of conscripting child soldiers. Lubanga was the leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots and stands accused of being the military authority behind the abduction of children as young as eleven to serve the Patriotic Forces of the Liberation of Congo in the 1998-2003 war. Lubanga was handed over in 2006, the first suspect to be detained by the ICC, and has been on trial since 2009. 

This guilty verdict is great for the DR Congo and wonderful for the International Criminal Court. Last year former Nuremberg prosecutor Benjamin Ferencz told ICC judges: “Let the voice and the verdict of this esteemed global court now speak for the awakened conscience of the world.

Photo: Ed Oudenaarden/AP.

[AJ English Twitter; Al Jazeera; AP]

I think the last time I wrote about the ICC proceedings against Lubanga was back in 2010,  when the trial was suspended in order to ensure that proper procedures were being followed. As I wrote back then:

Regardless of Lubanga’s guilt (which really doesn’t seem to be in much doubt), the Court is setting an important precedent here: instead of proceeding with a trial that might later be decried as sham justice, the ICC is putting its foot down now … about the fair trial standards that must be followed. The prosecution cannot keep information from the defense and it cannot flout the Court’s orders, not if we’re to look back on these trials and confirm that justice was done.

With so much talk in the past week about Joseph Kony — another warlord indicted by the ICC for conscripting child soldiers — it’s good to see the the Lubanga trial brought to a close with a guilty verdict. International justice efforts, though still slow and selective, are beginning to take a toll on the long-standing culture of impunity for human rights abuses.

Of course, the only way to see more criminals in the dock is to arrest them

(Source: thepoliticalnotebook, via soupsoup)

picturesoftheday:

Thousands of young people desperate to study—and their parents—pushed  their way to the gates of the University of Johannesburg in South Africa  Tuesday, where some 11,000 people were expected to vie for as few as  800 spots. One woman died in the crush.

picturesoftheday:

Thousands of young people desperate to study—and their parents—pushed their way to the gates of the University of Johannesburg in South Africa Tuesday, where some 11,000 people were expected to vie for as few as 800 spots. One woman died in the crush.

(via npr)

npr:

think-progress:

Check this out: “Progressive” is viewed more positively than “conservative” and every other political label in America.

You can read the full report over on Pew’s website: Little Change in Public’s Response to ‘Capitalism,’ ‘Socialism’

npr:

think-progress:

Check this out: “Progressive” is viewed more positively than “conservative” and every other political label in America.

You can read the full report over on Pew’s website: Little Change in Public’s Response to ‘Capitalism,’ ‘Socialism’

npr:

Answering The Question ‘What Was It A Good Year For?’
We asked for your input — and hundreds of readers responded  with their suggestions of the things that had a good 2011. Then we took  the results and used them to seed a Word Cloud.

npr:

Answering The Question ‘What Was It A Good Year For?’

We asked for your input — and hundreds of readers responded with their suggestions of the things that had a good 2011. Then we took the results and used them to seed a Word Cloud.

americanroutes:


Berry once punched Keith Richards in the face for tapping him on the  shoulder, and has a reputation for being both ornery and withdrawn, but  today he isn’t either of those things. He’s gracious, in a southern sort  of way. Pleased to meet you. He shakes hands and his hands swallow up  the hands of his guest. He once was as handsome as Elvis, and he’s still  got a great face, and eyes that don’t seem so much cruel or aloof as  just kind of wry and sharp and maybe a bit amused, like he’s in on some  sort of joke.

Great article from Esquire on Chuck Berry, who’s still alive, still performing, and recording songs that he doesn’t want you to hear.
Photo by Danny Clinch

americanroutes:

Berry once punched Keith Richards in the face for tapping him on the shoulder, and has a reputation for being both ornery and withdrawn, but today he isn’t either of those things. He’s gracious, in a southern sort of way. Pleased to meet you. He shakes hands and his hands swallow up the hands of his guest. He once was as handsome as Elvis, and he’s still got a great face, and eyes that don’t seem so much cruel or aloof as just kind of wry and sharp and maybe a bit amused, like he’s in on some sort of joke.

Great article from Esquire on Chuck Berry, who’s still alive, still performing, and recording songs that he doesn’t want you to hear.

Photo by Danny Clinch

(via npr)

keithwj:

“The Girl in the Blue Bra” 

There have been countless accounts of violence recorded during the uprisings in Egypt but the image that perhaps has captured the most attention is the most recent. The image has been widely referred to as the “girl in the blue bra.”
A veiled young woman is dragged and beaten by Egyptian military during a protest in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Her face is covered. Her torso is bare, except for her bright-blue bra, which is a millisecond away from being kicked by a solider. - NPR Picture Show (photo-Reuters/Landov)



Public silence

keithwj:

“The Girl in the Blue Bra” 

There have been countless accounts of violence recorded during the uprisings in Egypt but the image that perhaps has captured the most attention is the most recent. The image has been widely referred to as the “girl in the blue bra.”

A veiled young woman is dragged and beaten by Egyptian military during a protest in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Her face is covered. Her torso is bare, except for her bright-blue bra, which is a millisecond away from being kicked by a solider. - NPR Picture Show (photo-Reuters/Landov)

Public silence

(via npr)

beanfield:

Bookstore Selexyz Dominicanen in Maastricht 

beanfield:

Bookstore Selexyz Dominicanen in Maastricht 

(via npr)

"I’m not a medical professional, but it seems obvious that human beings aren’t meant to spend 45 hours a week sitting still in a chair."

Gina Trapani which echoes why I’ve started working at a standing desk. (via @ftantillo)

(Source: soupsoup)